Posted in academic writing

Leap day = thesis day?!

It’s Monday morning and I should be full of joy about the opportunities ahead. Not only is a new week starting, but today is leap day – what a rare chance to have a leap day during the PhD! (Is it?) Somehow all I want to do is crawl to bed though.

BUT I saw a tweet just now saying “What Leap day means for me: an extra day of thesis writing.. ” (by @A_GowardBrown). I liked that attitude and that got me thinking that I ought to be more positive! After all, the sun is shining here in the English Midlands, I don’t have any appointments or teaching commitments today and I don’t need to sit on a train for hours. All of these rather rare events coming together seem to make this leap day really special with an extra few hours for me to get that chapter draft fixed.

By the way, I wish I knew how to add the tweet here looking like properly embedded, like a clickable screenshot. Does anyone know?

I don’t have energy for checking now – and it would only be procrastination anyway. So what I’ll try to do is to pretend I’m attending one of the lovely ‘Shut Up & Work’ events at my Grad School’s PGRHub, with a self-enforced schedule and tasks for every working session and plenty of breaks with biscuits and coffee. Perhaps I can move the afternoon session to a cafe.

Happy Shut Up and Working 😉

 

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Author:

I am a research fellow on the CLiC Dickens project at the Centre for Corpus Research, University of Birmingham. My research interests focus on the use of corpus linguistic tools to identify meaning in texts. In the CLiC Dickens project we develop and use methods to study the language of literary texts, particularly in Dickens’s and other 19th century fiction. My PhD research seeks to understand connections in discourse through a corpus linguistic approach. Specifically, I study how the concept of surveillance is represented in different types of texts. This blog reflects my personal opinions and not those of my employers.

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