Posted in academia, academic writing, PhD

The joy of moving on to the next chapter

I’m very happy to share the news about moving on from my first analysis chapter (Chapter 4 in the thesis).  On January 31  I was already sharing my frustration about writing this chapter and now, exactly two months later, I finally have a full draft. Actually, I’ve been sitting on this draft for a while with only a few paragraphs that needed reworking or were still in the shape of bullet points. In the mean time the text has been part of various different documents/files. The screenshot here displays the metadata of the current file. I know it’s at ~ 17,000 words too long for the final chapter. Now this number includes tables that I might shorten/delete/move to the appendix in the final thesis. The document also has a rather long background and methodological section which I might have to move to the background and methodology chapters of my thesis at a later stage.

Screen Shot 2016-03-31 at 16.11.28.png

For now, though, I’m just really happy that I was psychologically able to call it a ‘full draft’. This means I sent it to a friend today who will have a look at it and give me some comments. She’s also a linguist, but works in a different subfield. I need some distancing from this text and – as I’ve been feeling quite insecure – either some confirmation that it is an okay text or some advice on what is needed to clarify things a bit. I won’t go back to this until late April or early May, though.

I think that having worked on this chapter or preparatory stages for it since September has been too long of an intense period of thinking about this particular aspect of my PhD. My supervisor has been urging me to move on and today I finally felt ready to let it go. I know that it’s nowhere near the shape that I need it in for my final thesis. Some references aren’t probably as relevant as I first thought and others are lacking. The argumentation may not be clear enough. But I am moving on to the next stage of my analysis where I’m applying the same method to a different dataset. I am sure this will also give me more ideas for the analysis of the first corpus.

Best of all, I can feel some enthusiasm again! Have you felt tired about any of your chapters? Did it help to move on to something new and return to the work after a couple of weeks? Or have you found it most useful to fully finish one chapter/study before starting something else?

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Author:

I am a research fellow on the CLiC Dickens project at the Centre for Corpus Research, University of Birmingham. My research interests focus on the use of corpus linguistic tools to identify meaning in texts. In the CLiC Dickens project we develop and use methods to study the language of literary texts, particularly in Dickens’s and other 19th century fiction. My PhD research seeks to understand connections in discourse through a corpus linguistic approach. Specifically, I study how the concept of surveillance is represented in different types of texts. This blog reflects my personal opinions and not those of my employers.

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