Posted in academia, Conferences/events

University of Birmingham Corpus Linguistics Summer School

This week (20 – 24 June 2016) a corpus linguistics summer school took place at the University of Birmingham Centre for Corpus Research. I was fortunate to be involved in the event.
The schedule was tight, but it seems to have been well worth it, as these tweets from participants suggest:
The full virtual Twitter conversation from throughout the week can be found under the hashtag #ccrss16.
Topics ranged from multiple facets of corpus statistics and their applications in R to Sinclairian lexical items, corpus stylistics and translation studies, specialised corpora and an introduction to Python for corpus linguists. The workshops and talks were held by Johan de Joode, Stefan Evert, Chris Fallaize, Matt Gee, Stefan Th. Gries, Nicholas Groom, Susan Hunston, Andrew Kehoe, Michaela Mahlberg, Lorenzo Mastropierro, Florent Perek, Simon Preston, Pablo Ruano, Adam Schembri, Paul Thompson and I. While most of us are based at UoB, it was great to have colleagues from other institutions and even from abroad join us to share their expertise.
My own session was inspired by a talk from Mark Davies at the ICAME 37 conference (Chinese University of Hong Kong, May 2016), where he demoed the new ‘virtual corpus’ feature on the BYU corpus interface.[Click on the links for the PDF versions of my presentations slides and the handout of my session].
Personally I enjoyed this week of intense exposure to different aspects of corpus linguistics. Full-week events like conferences and summer schools can be quite draining as you have to be ‘always on’, responding to new contents and people. However, the learning hopefully makes up for that.
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Author:

I am a research fellow on the CLiC Dickens project at the Centre for Corpus Research, University of Birmingham. My research interests focus on the use of corpus linguistic tools to identify meaning in texts. In the CLiC Dickens project we develop and use methods to study the language of literary texts, particularly in Dickens’s and other 19th century fiction. My PhD research seeks to understand connections in discourse through a corpus linguistic approach. Specifically, I study how the concept of surveillance is represented in different types of texts. This blog reflects my personal opinions and not those of my employers.

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