Posted in academia, Conferences/events, corpus linguistics

Free teacher workshop: corpus stylistics for the English classroom

I have recently started working as a Research Fellow on the CLiC Dickens project at the Centre for Corpus Research, University of Birmingham. The main focus of this project is the custom-developed CLiC web app, which allows to use corpus tools – i.e. search, concordance, find clusters (repeated phrases) etc. – in Dickens’s novels and other 19th century fiction.

Next week the CLiC Dickens project is hosting a free workshop for English teachers (and those interested in/researching teaching methods for literature): ‘Corpus stylistics for the English classroom‘ at the University of Birmingham on June 16, 2017. If you’re interested, please do check the event link. Registration is easy & free via email (to me) and refreshments will be provided :).

You can also check out some of the CLiC functionality in this recent video tutorial that introduces the CLiC KWICGrouper; a new approach to sorting concordances! (Read my previous blog post for more information on reading, sorting and analysing concordances.)

As the CLiC Dickens project is about corpus linguistics and meaning, the work is pretty ‘close to home’ (it’s also physically in the same department) in terms of my previous work. At the same time, there are some new directions in it for me: corpus stylistics is concerned with meaningful patterns in literature (mainly, anyway) and this is quite different from my PhD research which looks at non-fiction (academic writing, blog posts and newspaper articles). Moreover, the CLiC project combines its corpus stylistic approach with ‘cognitive poetics’, which is another really exciting direction.

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Author:

I am a research fellow on the CLiC Dickens project at the Centre for Corpus Research, University of Birmingham. My research interests focus on the use of corpus linguistic tools to identify meaning in texts. In the CLiC Dickens project we develop and use methods to study the language of literary texts, particularly in Dickens’s and other 19th century fiction. My PhD research seeks to understand connections in discourse through a corpus linguistic approach. Specifically, I study how the concept of surveillance is represented in different types of texts. This blog reflects my personal opinions and not those of my employers.

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